Tony Cragg, Versus
Tony Cragg, Versus, 2011, bronze.

In Versus our concept of the whole and the circular is challenged, where the elliptical form is put in to columns in a discus shaped form, and remind us more of the chaotic and microscopic, than the round and calm. Like a pot of boiling water, or the internally exploding sun, Versus is constantly cooking and creating new shapes.

 

Tony Cragg, Manipulation, 2010, bronze.
Tony Cragg, Manipulation, 2010, bronze.

In Manipulation, a word to originally mean “handling”, we see a manipulated hand breaking free from its original form, by own will or by internal struggles. Every finger like shape seem to fight for its own, perhaps to escape manipulation. Once you move closer to this energetic mass, letters from Greek and Latin alphabets appear, as fighting from the inside and through the bronze. Manipulation hides in its core a powerful force, ready for liberation.

 

Tony Cragg, Points of View, 2013, stainless steel.
Tony Cragg, Points of View, 2013, stainless steel.

Placed on a point of its own, Points of View invites it’s viewer to take a look at themselves and their surroundings with a new perspective. With the closeness of the water, a dynamic relationship is established between the mirroring stainless steel and the reflections of natures own looking glass, water. Points of View is seemingly in a constant dialogue, but ends up asking more questions with every movement we make, and escapes every attempt of being defined.

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Tony Cragg, Caldera, 2008, bronze, 480x372x342 cm. Photo: GAS

The five meter high Caldera is named after the geological term for a volcanic crater. Resting on three points, the sculpture creates a space for visitor to walk under and around its tumultuous form as they please. This massive piece of poetry unleashes drama by stirring up energy and emotion, as we first see tectonic plates collide, then change perspective and human facial profiles suddenly appears.

 

Tony Cragg, Turbo, 1999, bronze.
Tony Cragg, Turbo, 1999, bronze.

Taken form the series Early Forms, the small but forceful Turbo takes us on a fantasy journey through power, where size is not what dictates force. Aligned along a curved axis, the form of Turbo reminds us of how movement originates in the smaller forms, and is dependent on them to create greater power.